SERIOUS DRIVING OFFENSES

Driving related offenses often occur through inattention, a simple error in judgment, or fear. Sometimes a person is charged with a serious driving offense due to an overzealous police officer. Whatever the circumstances are in your particular case, you should contact a Washington criminal defense attorney to learn what can be done to resolve the situation to your benefit.  

Call my office at 206-905-1174 to set-up a FREE consultation.

Physical Control OF VEHICLE UNDER THE INFLUENCE

Physical Control is a Gross Misdemeanor that shares many similarities with DUI. For more details, read the DUI page and call my office for a FREE consultation. 

HIT AND RUN ATTENDED

Washington law requires a driver who knows he or she has been involved in an accident with an occupied vehicle to stop and provide his or her name, address, license, insurance company, and insurance policy number. Failure to provide this information may result in a criminal charge. Hit and Run Attended is a gross misdemeanor punishable by up to 364 days in jail and a $5,000 fine and revocation of your license.

HIT AND RUN UNATTENDED

The difference between Unattended and Attended involves a person in the other vehicle. Washington law requires a driver who knows he or she has been involved in an accident that damages property to stop and provide his or her name, address, license, insurance company, and insurance policy number. Failure to do this could result in a charge for Hit and Run Unattended which is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $1,000 fine; however, no license revocation occurs with this conviction.

RECKLESS DRIVING

Reckless driving is a serious crime. It is defined as driving with “willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property.” Conviction for this crime can result in up to 364 days in jail and a $5,000 fine. Also, your license will be suspended for at least 30 days. To be eligible to reinstate your license, the State of Washington will require you to get SR-22 insurance for 3 years. 

Racing as evidence of Reckless Driving

Racing another vehicle defined as any person who willfully compares or contests relative speeds of one or more vehicles, even if the vehicles do not exceed the speed limit, can be charged as Reckless Driving.

Speeding as evidence of Reckless Driving

Although not prescribed by statute, I have often seen drivers charged with Reckless Driving for exceeding the speed limit by 30 m.p.h. or more.

NEGLIGENT DRIVING 1st Degree

Can be charged when a police officer has evidence that a driver has operated a motor vehicle in a manner that is both “negligent and endangers or is likely to endanger any person or property and exhibits the effects of having consumed liquor or an illegal drug.” Negligent Driving in the 1st Degree is a misdemeanor with maximum penalties of up to 90 days in jail and $1,000 fine.

Call my office at 206-905-1174 to set-up a FREE consultation.